The Battery Metals Boom – Meeting the Supply & Demand Challenge

With the move to electric cars set to accelerate over the next 20 years, the market for the battery metals required is starting to boom.

The Reuters Events webinar discussed the following issue:  

  • How can the market meet the growing demand for lithium? The effects new entrants and increased capacity will have on pricing.
  • As some major EV manufacturers move away from Cobalt due to scarcity, what demand will look like over the next decade?
  • With Europe fast following China in the race to EVs – the evolution of the battery metals market.

How to make electric vehicles batteries sustainable?

Michael Willoughby (Co-Head Metals and Mining – Asia Pacific at Standard Chartered Bank): “It’s going to be quite a while before batteries start coming off Teslas ready to recycle. Tesla is talking about buying back their cars after their life to either recycle them or repurpose them, refurbish them as taxis.”

John Burba (CEO at International Battery Metals Ltd): “There will be a significant amount of capital and significant cost to recover it”

How can the market meet the growing demand for lithium?

Michael Willoughby (Co-Head Metals and Mining – Asia Pacific at Standard Chartered Bank): “The reluctance of Western companies to put serious capital down in battery materials has left them far behind their Chinese peers who have been a lot more vertically integrated and have put a lot more capital in both lithium, nickel, and cobalt.”

John Burba (CEO at International Battery Metals Ltd): “I think there are a lot of lithium resources there yet undiscovered. It is going to take an effort” to find these things and start extracting it. I think the lithium extraction industry in 20 or 30 years is going to look a lot like the global well industry does.”

Evolution of the battery metals market around the world

John Burba (CEO at International Battery Metals Ltd): “I think it is going to be overall energy efficiency. The big development on the cars, the next thing I think is, is a substantial increase in driving range and battery capacity.”

Michael Willoughby (Co-Head Metals and Mining – Asia Pacific at Standard Chartered Bank): “In Hong Kong, I think the biggest selling car at one point was the Tesla. Charging points were everywhere, it was mainstream and everyone who bought a Tesla there would never ever buy anything else. Singapore is very different.”

Watch the full webinar

The Battery Metals Boom – Meeting the Supply & Demand Challenge

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